Kodak Ultramax, a Film Based All Rounder

A versatile film recipe for Kodak Ultramax using the Astia film simulation

Whilst most of my film recipes fit into the nostalgic recipes or warm tones recipes categories, I do occasionally try to make a look that mimics the feel of a real 35mm film.

Finding a good selection of sample images is the key, and then looking to match the aesthetic with one of the available film simulations. I find that prints tend to vary quite a bit, and whilst Fujicolor ones most often look similar to Classic Negative, ones by other marques don’t, from the sample images at least, follow a set pattern. For Kodak Ultramax, I found Astia the best match, and so this is the base sim for the recipe.

On the dockside, with the Kodak Ultramax film recipe

Kodak Ultramax Film Recipe

  • Simulation: Astia/Soft
  • Grain Effect: Weak, Small
  • Colour Chrome Effect: Weak
  • Colour Chrome Blue: Strong
  • White Balance: Underwater
  • WB Shift: +3 Red, -5 Blue
  • Dynamic Range: DR200
  • Highlights: +0.5 (use +1 if your camera doesn’t support 0.5)
  • Shadows: +0.5 (use 0 if your camera doesn’t support 0.5)
  • Color: -2
  • Sharpness: -2
  • ISO Noise Reduction: -4
  • Clarity: 0
  • EV compensation: +1/3
Autumn hints, using the Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Did it make a sound? Kodak Ultramax film recipe
A place to sit and rest, captured with Kodak Ultramax film recipe
The pink ferry shelter, with Kodak Ultramax film recipe
The ferry launch pontoon, captured with Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Bumpers for the ferry in rough weather, Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Out for a run, using the Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Leaves, clouds and sky, using the Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Interesting brickwork, captured with Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Maritime art gallery, captured using Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Dani Rowe’s gold post box, with Kodak Ultramax film recipe
The grand windows of Winchester Cathedral, Kodak Ultramax recipe
13:07 on a sunny day. Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Oak trees and fence, with the Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Wooded footpath, Kodak Ultramax film recipe
A few early Autumn leaves, Kodak Ultramax film recipe
A heron watches over the pond at Rhinefield House
She’s holding a swan, not a baguette! Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Refecting pond at Rhinefield House, Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Along a country lane, with Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Later summer leaves in sunlight, Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Walking trail in the shady woods, Kodak Ultramax film recipe
Sweet chestnuts, almost ready … Kodak Ultramax film recipe

Kodak Ultramax by Other Creators

Just like with Kodachrome and Portra, there are multiple versions of Kodak Ultramax out there. I’m happy with the one I have created, but you may prefer one of these instead.

You can also take a look at my other Kodak film recipes.

Did you know? The Film Recipes Facebook Group is a great place to share film recipes, ask questions and join the latest challenge. Join in the fun! The December round of the Film Recipe Challenge is now on … shoot with Mother Superia film recipe and share your photos, either in the Facebook group or in the recipe page comments. End date is Dec 15th.

2 responses to “Kodak Ultramax, a Film Based All Rounder”

  1. But it does look like a (long and limp) baguette from this angle 😀
    But more interestingly, the gold post box!
    The bench setting, though, so peaceful.

    Love looking at photos without people, it makes my brain happy. I’m intensely introverted. My brain can’t filter out faces and voices.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you … I’ll thin baguette whenever I pass by there now!

      Yes, I really love the gold postboxes. They started in 2012 I think, when the Olympics were in London, and they continue today. There are even a few rogue ones to support people who everyone associates with a town, even if it’s not quite true!

      I don’t dislike people at all, or striking up a conversation, but I prefer natural images and scenes with only occasional people in. I think I have more with animals than people, ha ha!

      Like

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